Government Pg 2

(Denominations)

INTRODUCTION

 

Without laws there would be chaos and mayhem. Laws are based on morals passed down through the ages through Judeo-Christian history.

The dignity of human life, common decency, and the support of traditional family values have been the backbone to society and are crucial to society. It has been witnessed and experienced that the break down of the family is the break down of society.

Government laws and the judicial system must uphold the underlining values. Today, in the Twenty First Century, these very values are under attack.

1800

Government A-Z

 

A-M

Josephine Butler

 

 

 

 

 

 

Butler in 1851, portrait by George Richmond

 

Josephine Elizabeth Butler (née Grey; 13 April 1828 – 30 December 1906) was an English feminist and social reformer in the Victorian era. She campaigned for women's suffrage, the right of women to better education, the end of coverture in British law, the abolition of child prostitution, and an end to human trafficking of young women and children into European prostitution.

Grey grew up in a well-to-do and politically connected progressive family which helped develop in her a strong social conscience and firmly held religious ideals.

 

She married George Butler, an Anglican divine and schoolmaster, and the couple had four children, the last of whom, Eva, died falling from a banister. The death was a turning point for Butler, and she focused her feelings on helping others, starting with the inhabitants of a local workhouse.

Campaign for the protection of children from abuse 

Passionate Christian Josephine Butler campaigned for the age of consent to be set and was a key figure in other social reforms such as the abolition of child prostitution, and an end to human trafficking of young women and children into European prostitution.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Josephine_Butler

Factory Reform
Anthony Ashley Cooper

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Anthony Ashley Cooper, 7th Earl of Shaftesbury KG (28 April 1801 – 1 October 1885)

The 7th Earl of Shaftsbury was inspired by his faith to do many things.


He became a Tory MP (Member of Parliament) in 1826, and almost immediately became a leader of the movement for factory reform. He was responsible for promoting a plethora of reform causes, including the Factory Acts of 1847 and 1853, the Ten Hour Bill, as well as the Mines and Collieries Act 1842 and the Lunacy Act 1845.

 

One of his chief interests was the welfare of children, and he was chairman of the Ragged Schools Union and a keen supporter of Florence Nightingale. He was also involved as patron and president in the field of model dwellings companies, which sought to improve the housing of working classes in England.

 

 

 


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anthony_Ashley-Cooper,_7th_Earl_of_Shaftesbury

Factory Reform
Richard Oastler 

Richard Oastler (20 December 1789 – 22 August 1861) "the Factory King" 

The protection of young people and children who had been laboring in factories became the passion of Richard Oastler. He became a strong advocate for reduced hours on child labor. The Factory Act came into being in 1847. 

http://www.christianhistorytimeline.com/DAILYF/2002/09/daily-09-29-2002.shtml

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Oastle

Prison Reform
Elizabeth Fry

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Elizabeth Fry (née Gurney; 21 May 1780 – 12 October 1845), often referred to as Betsy Fry, was an English prison reformersocial reformer and, as a Quaker, a Christian philanthropist. She has often been referred to as the "angel of prisons".

Fry was a major driving force behind new legislation to make the treatment of prisoners more humane, and she was supported in her efforts by Queen Victoria. She was depicted on the Bank of England £5 note from 2001–2016. Fry kept extensive and revealing diaries.

Prison Work

Prompted by a family friend, Stephen Grellet, Fry visited Newgate Prison in 1813. The conditions she saw there horrified her.[6] The women's section was overcrowded with women and children, some of whom had not even received a trial. The prisoners did their own cooking and washing in the small cells in which they slept on straw.

 

She returned the following day with food and clothes for some prisoners. 

Fry returned in 1816 and was eventually able to fund a prison school for the children who were imprisoned with their mothers.

 

Rather than attempt to impose discipline on the women, she suggested rules and then asked the prisoners to vote on them.

 

In 1817 she helped found the Association for the Reformation of the Female Prisoners in Newgate. This association provided materials for women so that they could learn to sew patchwork which was calming and also allowed skills to develop, such as needlework[8] and knitting which could offer employment when they were out of prison and then could earn money for themselves.[9] This approach was copied elsewhere and led to the eventual creation of the British Ladies' Society for Promoting the Reformation of Female Prisoners in 1821.[10]

 

She also promoted the idea of rehabilitation instead of harsh punishment which was taken on by the city authorities in London as well as many other authorities and prisons.

Reputation

One admirer was Queen Victoria, who granted her an audience a few times before she was Queen and contributed money to her cause after she ascended to the throne.[11]Another admirer was Robert Peel who passed several acts to further her cause including the Gaols Act 1823. The act was largely ineffective, because there were no inspectors to make sure that it was being followed.

At the age of 18, young Elizabeth was deeply moved by the preaching of William Savery, an American Quaker. 
Motivated by his words, she took an interest in the poor, the sick, and the prisoners. She collected old clothes for the poor, visited those who were sick in her neighborhood, and started a Sunday school in the summer house to teach children to read.


Fry was a major driving force behind new legislation to make the treatment of prisoners more humane, and she was supported in her efforts by the reigning monarch. Since 2001, she has been depicted on the Bank of England £5 note.
 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elizabeth_Fry
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prison_reform#United_Kingdom

 

N-Z

Slavery Abolition Act 1833

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

William Wilberforce (24 August 1759 – 29 July 1833) was an English politician known as a leader of the movement to stop the slave trade.


Wilberforce was a Member of Parliament and in office, 31 October 1780 – February 1825.


He was a devout Christian and was convinced of the importance of religion, morality and education. He championed causes and campaigns such as the Society for the Suppression of Vice, British missionary work in India, the creation of a free colony in Sierra Leone, the foundation of the Church Mission Society, and the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. His underlying conservatism led him to support politically and socially controversial legislation, and resulted in criticism that he was ignoring injustices at home while campaigning for the enslaved abroad.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Wilberforce

Lew Wallace

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lewis Wallace (April 10, 1827 – February 15, 1905) was an American lawyer, Union general in the American Civil Wargovernor of the New Mexico Territory, politician, diplomat, and author from Indiana. Among his novels and biographies, Wallace is best known for his historical adventure story, Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ (1880), a bestselling novel that has been called "the most influential Christian book of the nineteenth century."[1]

Wallace's military career included service in the Mexican–American War and the American Civil War. He was appointed Indiana's adjutant general and commanded the 11th Indiana Infantry Regiment. Wallace, who attained the rank of major general, participated in the Battle of Fort Donelson, the Battle of Shiloh, and the Battle of Monocacy. He also served on the military commission for the trials of the Lincoln assassination conspirators, and presided over the trial of Henry Wirz, the Confederate commandant of the Andersonville prison camp.

Wallace resigned from the U.S. Army in November 1865 and briefly served as a major general in the Mexican army, before returning to the United States. Wallace was appointed governor of the New Mexico Territory (1878–81) and served as U.S. minister to the Ottoman Empire (1881–85). Wallace retired to his home in Crawfordsville, Indiana, where he continued to write until his death in 1905.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lew_Wallace

John Wanamaker
35th United States Postmaster General

 

 

John Wanamaker (July 11, 1838 – December 12, 1922) was an American merchant and religious, civic and political figure, considered by some to be a proponent of advertising and a "pioneer in marketing".[1] He was born in PhiladelphiaPennsylvania, and served as U.S. Postmaster General.

He built the World's first Department Store.

Postmaster General

In 1889 Wanamaker began the First Penny Savings Bank in order to encourage thrift. That same year he was appointed United States Postmaster General by President Benjamin Harrison. Wanamaker was credited by his friends with introducing the first commemorative stamp and many efficiencies to the Postal Service. He was the first to make plans for free rural postal service in the United States, although the plan was not implemented until 1896.[14]

https://lights4god.wordpress.com/?s=wanamaker
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Wanamaker

 

 
ABOUT US

To submit other kinds of info send to: contact@debunkingatheism.com

ADDRESS

Someplace Beautiful:

The United States of America

ABOUT 

Doing everything we can to give people the tools they need to debate atheism and further their knowledge of the Universe.

SUBSCRIBE FOR EMAILS

follow US

© 2023 by HARMONY. Proudly created with Wix.com